Local news

What can I recycle – updated information

Did you know that there are over 220 items that you can now recycle in Cornwall?  The list is growing all the time, and Cornwall Council has a page on their website where you can search for things and find out how they can recycled. You can also find your collection days, and order new containers.

They also invite suggestions for items that should be on the list, and they will endeavour to find a way that it can be recycled – email cornwallrecycles@cornwall.gov.uk

 

I Dig Trees

Free trees for community groups, schools, parklands and green spaces with public access.

Anyone can apply for the free trees on behalf of community groups, schools, parklands, or any green space with public access providing they have the landowner’s permission, and TCV and OVO Energy are also offering tree planting events for volunteers up and down the UK. To get the trees, which are available in packs of 50, community groups need to register on the TCV site.

The tree packs are predetermined with varieties that best suit a particular growing environment and all are recommended UK varieties: parkland, large garden, small garden and wildlife & shrubs.

Find out more on the I Dig Trees website.

 

Cornish homes in green energy trial

Hundreds of Cornish homes and businesses took part in a trial, selling electricity back to the local grid, from solar panels on their roofs. Find out more in the Guardian online.

 

Funding opportunities

New funding available for community green energy projects

The Government’s Rural Community Energy Fund (RCEF) is inviting new community projects across England to apply for feasibility study grants of up to £40,000 to support renewable energy initiatives.

A second funding stage will award grants of up to £100,000 for business development and planning applications.

Find out more, and apply, on the Gov.uk website..

 

Climate change initiatives to receive £100m National Lottery funding

The Climate Action Fund is aimed at helping ‘people and communities’ to take the lead in delivering high-impact, community-led climate action. The various activities that could be eligible for funding include sustainable energy, sustainable transport, consumption, food and protecting and regenerating spaces and habitats.

See the National Lottery’s press statement for more details:

The first round of this funding closes on 18 December for initial ideas, with full proposals due in by 27 March. To apply, go to the National Lottery’s Community Fund web page.

 

News about climate change and environmental damage

Ships pollution threat

Ships’ environmental devices, designed to protect the air from pollution, are instead pumping harmful waste into the sea, a report has revealed.

For more information , see the Independent website.

 

Climate change policies will alter the landscape

Changes to the natural environment will be increasingly obvious, as climate change takes effect.  More trees are being planted, and changes to the manner in which farming is carried out will also be noticeable. There is an interesting BBC article which gives opposing viewpoints on exactly what changes are needed, and what this will look like.

 

Global climate change emergency

Scientists worldwide are increasingly alarmed about climate change, with a letter published by 11,000 scientists in 153 countries calling for urgent action at the start of November. (See the Independent for details)

Subsequently, a report has been published showing that up to ten climate change ‘tipping points’ have been reached recently. These tipping points were identified a decade ago, and include such things as melting arctic sea ice reaching a point where it is simply not possible for it to grow, only continue to shrink. For more information on tipping points, and the calls for action, see the Independent.

 

Fracking

An in other news, it looks like fracking has been halted in the UK, possibly for good. After eight years of protests, the Government finally decided that the level of risk to the communities around the fracking sites was too great, following an earthquake of magnitude 2.9 near a site.

For a triumphant opinion piece, see the Guardian.